I’ve never heard of this program, but am definitely willing to try it. I do have a question, however; in my faith, we do not eat pig meat in any way, shape or form, so can I eat turkey bacon or sausage instead (for breakfast meats)? I’m not a day person, having worked the midnight shift for almost 20 years, so the meat/breakfast just isn’t relevant–I’d prefer to eat dinner-type foods instead–but if it has to be done in order to lose (a huge amount of) weight, I’ll adjust.
Hello Myriam, I am a dual certified personal trainer and Sports Nutrition Specialist. I really love how concisely you have put this article together. I did notice that on your macro breakdown for a 1500 calorie diet you actually listed the protein intake at around 31% of the daily calories (117*4=468..468/1500=.31). I was wondering if you did this to bring the protein amount closer to 1 gram per pound of body-weight to preserve lean mass?
Wilder's colleague, paediatrician Mynie Gustav Peterman, later formulated the classic diet, with a ratio of one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight in children, 10–15 g of carbohydrate per day, and the remainder of calories from fat. Peterman's work in the 1920s established the techniques for induction and maintenance of the diet. Peterman documented positive effects (improved alertness, behaviour and sleep) and adverse effects (nausea and vomiting due to excess ketosis). The diet proved to be very successful in children: Peterman reported in 1925 that 95% of 37 young patients had improved seizure control on the diet and 60% became seizure-free. By 1930, the diet had also been studied in 100 teenagers and adults. Clifford Joseph Barborka, Sr., also from the Mayo Clinic, reported that 56% of those older patients improved on the diet and 12% became seizure-free. Although the adult results are similar to modern studies of children, they did not compare as well to contemporary studies. Barborka concluded that adults were least likely to benefit from the diet, and the use of the ketogenic diet in adults was not studied again until 1999.[10][14]
What she said…I, too, get overwhelmed when I think of trying to put a keto diet together. The basic concepts are clear, but the stumbling block is what to make, and how to combine recipes to get the magic numbers for the day. I would appreciate menu plans very much…and thank you for this post which has me determined to get started on a keto way of eating.
This reminds me …… just after WWll, when there wasn’t a lot of meat available let alone any *special* foods to enjoy, my MoM used to cook up strips of bacon, then make creamed Mushrooms and supper would be bacon and creamed mushrooms on toast ….. ummmm it was so good! Your recipe not only brought back a memory but has also spurned me to make myself some bacon with creamed mushrooms on toast for my dinner tomorrow night 🤗
For breakfast, we are going to change it up a bit. Here’s where we introduce ketoproof coffee. Now, don’t get me wrong – I know some of you won’t like it. If you’re not a fan of coffee, then try it with tea. If you’re not a fan of the taste (which is very rare), then try making a mixture of the ingredients by themselves and eating it like that. So, why ketoproof coffee?
My husband is trying to eat more Keto meals and this recipe is made up of his FAVORITE things! I sent him the link to it and he was inspired! Last night, he made himself a big hearty batch of this recipe and thoroughly loved it. He even shared photos of his meal on Facebook and our friends were in awe of his creation and the recipe you provided. I don’t enjoy mushrooms, so I’m reviewing this on my husband’s behalf. It was EXCELLENT!
Melissa I stumbled upon your site today and am so thankful that I did!!!! I’m starting this 3 day keto jump start today!!! I have 50 lbs to loose and I want my energy back and I want my life back!!!! Tired of being tired!! I love that you have gluten free recipes as my son was diagnosed with Aspbergers a year ago (high functioning autism) and I let my self go! I’ve got to get heathy so I can help my son so we can be on this journey together!!!! Thank you so much Melissa!!!
The first month or two on keto you may experience some strange periods (aka. Shark Week.) Don’t be alarmed. When you lose weight and your body detoxes from sugar and excess carbs, all kinds of hormonal changes (for the better) occur. Initially though, you may experience heavier periods than normal, more extreme PMS symptoms, etc. This is normal, and while it’s inconvenient it shouldn’t last more than a few months at the most.If your weight loss is rapid on keto (let’s hope), you may also lose more hair than normal for a month or two. It can be disconcerting, but it’s not permanent and will stop when your hormones regulate.
There are ways around the vitamin K issue and that would be eating the veggies that vit k are found in on a regular, consistant basis then getting your PT/INR levels checkeed every few days until you can reach therapeutic level. Only problem would be if you deviated from how much vit k containing food you ate – if you ate more than usual your blood would be thick and if you ate less than usual your blood would get to thin. So, the key here is establishing the amt of veggies you eat in a day and sticking to that amouth every day :)
The ketogenic diet is based on the principle that by depleting the body of carbohydrates, which are its primary source of energy, you can force the body to burn fat for fuel, thereby maximizing weight loss. When you consume foods that contain carbohydrates, the body converts those carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar, which it then uses for energy. (1)

Those issues can be part of what's known as the “keto flu,” Warren says. Other side effects of the keto diet, all of which are tied to carb withdrawal, can include lightheadedness, nausea, mental fog, cramps, and headaches, in addition to tiredness. Luckily, the keto flu doesn't usually last more than a week—which is coincidentally about when people start to see the number on the scale go down, says Warren.
Because people with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, there’s a specific concern that the saturated fat in the diet may drive up LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol levels, and further increase the odds of heart problems. If you have type 2 diabetes, talk to your doctor before attempting a ketogenic diet. They may recommend a different weight-loss diet for you, like a reduced-calorie diet, to manage diabetes. Those with epilepsy should also consult their doctor before using this as part of their treatment plan.
×