Thank you Mellissa. I guess I need to set up a Reddit account. Several people have directed me there for Keto forums for one reason or another. I try not to let it get me down but I have been fluctuating really badly since I started this WOE and I have a feeling it has a lot to do with the hormones not being balanced. I came off of a prepackaged, doctor recommended food plan that really knocked me outta whack and helped me discover that I do indeed have an under-active thyroid, which I have known most of my life because I have always felt hormonally off balance and could never lose weight. It is also genetic in my family but doctors never listened to me and at most would run the basic blood test to appease me which always came back normal…which is common…and when they did, they would lecture me about losing weight and hand me a prescription for diet pills or give me info on some fad diet. Now I am trying to fix it with Keto and natural remedies. I feel better than I ever have in my life on the energy front and that was almost an instant feeling after switching to Keto. I hope I balance out soon because I am 35-40 lbs down since mid-May (depending on my fluctuation for the week) and have about 100+ to go. The frustrating part is I have now lost the same 3-5 lbs repeatedly over the past 5-6 weeks and all I can think is that could have been 20-30 lbs closer to my goal weight! I even considered going back on that nasty diet even though I felt terrible because I did lose consistently. I have confirmed my macros with some others who are more experienced and they are just as boggled as I am about the bad fluctuation.
I’d like to add to your last point because my uterus hated me for a week! I have the IUD (Mirena) and I honestly don’t remember when my last period was, guesstimating I’d say 8 months ago. Since having the IUD I only spot and rarely have a period (I’ve had it since 2014), but OMG my hormones must’ve been all over the place because I not only got a heavy period but I had it for 9 days straight!
For patients who benefit, half achieve a seizure reduction within five days (if the diet starts with an initial fast of one to two days), three-quarters achieve a reduction within two weeks, and 90% achieve a reduction within 23 days. If the diet does not begin with a fast, the time for half of the patients to achieve an improvement is longer (two weeks) but the long-term seizure reduction rates are unaffected.[43] Parents are encouraged to persist with the diet for at least three months before any final consideration is made regarding efficacy.[9]

You’re so welcome Jessica – you and me both! I’m looking forward to feeling good again and having my clothes fit right will be nice too! ha ha! Thanks to all of your feedback I’ll be posting 7 day menu plans every Saturday, and we’ll all hopefully be reporting our pounds lost so far progress in the comments. I’m so looking forward to it – hope you’ll join us!!!
What she said…I, too, get overwhelmed when I think of trying to put a keto diet together. The basic concepts are clear, but the stumbling block is what to make, and how to combine recipes to get the magic numbers for the day. I would appreciate menu plans very much…and thank you for this post which has me determined to get started on a keto way of eating.
Short-term results for the LGIT indicate that at one month approximately half of the patients experience a greater than 50% reduction in seizure frequency, with overall figures approaching that of the ketogenic diet. The data (coming from one centre's experience with 76 children up to the year 2009) also indicate fewer side effects than the ketogenic diet and that it is better tolerated, with more palatable meals.[3][49]
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.

Y. Wady Aude, MD; Arthur S. Agatston, MD; Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, MD, MSc; Eric H. Lieberman, MD; Marie Almon, MS, RD; Melinda Hansen, ARNP; Gerardo Rojas, MD; Gervasio A. Lamas, MD; Charles H. Hennekens, MD, DrPH, “The National Cholesterol Education Program Diet vs a Diet Lower in Carbohydrates and Higher in Protein and Monounsaturated Fat,” Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(19):2141-2146. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=217514.
Lastly, if you're active, you might need to make some adjustments to take that into account. "For the first one to two weeks, temporarily reducing your exercise load can be helpful as your body adjusts to being in ketosis," he says. "Additionally, for those who have an intense workout schedule, carb cycling may be a good option." Carb cycling essentially means you'll increase your carb intake on the days you're doing exercise, ideally just two to three days per week. "While low-carb days may be around 20 to 30 grams of net carbs daily, high-carb days can range all the way up to 100 grams, although it can vary based on your size and activity level," says Dr. Axe. (Related: 8 Things You Need to Know About Exercising on the Keto Diet.) 
"You can find a lot of "fat bomb" recipes on the Internet," Wittrock says. "These are very good at satisfying your sweet tooth, and are a great way to increase fat consumption without going over on protein. Also, I'm a huge fan of salted pumpkin seeds and salted sunflower seed kernels. Believe it or not, pork rinds are also a very good keto snack."

A lot of people take their macros as a “set in stone” type of thing. You shouldn’t worry about hitting the mark every single day to the dot. If you’re a few calories over some days, a few calories under on others – it’s fine. Everything will even itself out in the end. It’s all about a long term plan that can work for you, and not the other way around.
I wanted to put it out there that I made this meal plan specifically with women in mind. I took an average of about 150 women and what their macros were. The end result was 1600 calories – broken down into 136g of fat, 74g of protein, and 20g net carbs a day. This is all built around a sedentary lifestyle, like most of us live. If you need to increase or decrease calories, you will need to do that on your own terms.
But even if you’re not trying to lose weight, the keto meal plans might appeal to you. By limiting sugars and processed grains, you lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Eating an array of heart-healthy fats, like nuts, olive oil and fish, can decrease your risk of heart disease. And while some people stick to a super strict keto diet, with 75 percent of their diet coming from fat, 20 percent from protein and just five from carbs, even a less intense, modified version can help you reap the keto diet’s benefits.

Although many hypotheses have been put forward to explain how the ketogenic diet works, it remains a mystery. Disproven hypotheses include systemic acidosis (high levels of acid in the blood), electrolyte changes and hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose).[18] Although many biochemical changes are known to occur in the brain of a patient on the ketogenic diet, it is not known which of these has an anticonvulsant effect. The lack of understanding in this area is similar to the situation with many anticonvulsant drugs.[55]
Other forms of ketogenic diets include cyclic ketogenic diets, also known as carb cycling, and targeted ketogenic diets, which allow for adjustments to carbohydrate intake around exercise. These modifications are typically implemented by athletes looking to use the ketogenic diet to enhance performance and endurance and not by individuals specifically focused on weight loss.

Anticonvulsants suppress epileptic seizures, but they neither cure nor prevent the development of seizure susceptibility. The development of epilepsy (epileptogenesis) is a process that is poorly understood. A few anticonvulsants (valproate, levetiracetam and benzodiazepines) have shown antiepileptogenic properties in animal models of epileptogenesis. However, no anticonvulsant has ever achieved this in a clinical trial in humans. The ketogenic diet has been found to have antiepileptogenic properties in rats.[55]


Keto breath, on the other hand, is less of a side-effect and more of a major (not harmful) inconvenience (your breath literally smells like nail polish remover). Basically, when your body breaks down all that extra fat on the keto diet, it produces ketones—one of which is the chemical acetone (yes, the same stuff that's in nail polish remover), Keatley previously told WomensHealthMag.com.
I just made this keto bread, and it is amazing! It’s better than most bread I’ve tasted! I made mine with bacon, American cheese, Brie, and Camembert (because I wanted to be extra). If you use bacon, cook it to how you normally like it in a seperate pan, as the bacon doesn’t cook much extra while baking. I think I used a little too much butter, but, oh boy, was it nice and moist!
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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