Just a followup to my earlier post with some quick numbers – I have been keeping carbs under 15 per day and the fat around 75-85%, with protein about 25% or less. I have not lost one pound while on the Keto diet, but I do feel that it is a much more natural way to eat. I don’t snack, I only eat 3 meals daily, I just cannot get into the habit of snacking and I’m not hungry enough to be bothered with additional food.

People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
The easiest macro to calculate in the ketogenic diet is fat. Once you've got your carbs and protein set, simply fill the rest of your daily calorie needs with fat sources. If you find yourself wanting to gain a bit of weight, add approximately 500 calories, or 55 grams. If you want to lose weight, cut down on your fat intake by 200-500 calories, or 22-55 grams.

So, in regards to #9….(guys, look away now) I have been keto for about a month and a half now. Shark week came and went as normal….Normally if I even get cramps, it’s for the first day or two of my period and they are never that bad. About a week later I started getting really really bad cramps…to the point they were waking me up in the middle of the night. Someone suggested constipation but I didn’t think that was it because I was still going…just not as much, which is normal on a keto/paleo plan. 9 days after my normal period ended, I started again and it was just like the previous when it came to flow. After the first 5 days which is when it should have ended, it started getting heavier and has stayed that way since. I am now on day 13 of this second period with no indication of an end in sight. I have not had this experience in years and that was due to birth control that I was taking at the time. I am miserable and in more pain than I have ever experienced. I have energy thanks to the keto but I am in far too much pain to even think about working out and it sucks! I know you said you went thru some irregularity yourself but was it anything like this? Do you know people that have experienced this? I have tried searching the web but everything that pops up talks about their periods disappearing or getting 2 in one month at most, not what I am experiencing which is probably going to be closer to a month before I end.
On a ketogenic diet, you’re generally eating a diet that’s high in fat (roughly 70 percent of your total calories come from fat), moderate in protein (about 20 percent of your calories), and low in carbohydrate (about 5 percent of calories). By limiting carbohydrates (to usually less than 45 grams for the average person), your body lacks the glucose (from carbs) that it normally uses for energy, so it eventually switches over to burning fat as its primary fuel source instead; through a metabolic process called ketosis, the liver converts the fat into fragments of fatty acids called ketones, which power the brain and other organs and tissues.
A review of multiple studies in the journal Nutrients found that ketogenic diets are connected to significant reductions in total cholesterol, increases in “good” HDL cholesterol levels, dips in triglycerides levels and decreases in “bad” LDL cholesterol; there are questions as to whether diets high in saturated fat negate these benefits. The same paper reports that a ketogenic may slightly reduce blood pressure, but science is still very scant on this point.
Now, what should you eat? There are endless combinations of food and it really depends on your personal preference. I put together a simple 3 day keto menu plan to get you started. This is what works for me, and because my body knows the drill, I can actually get back into ketosis in less than 2 days on this plan. If you are new to low carb, it may take you as long as 4 to 5 days. Don’t despair, it will happen.

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It doesn’t matter to your body whether the fat it’s burning is from your existing reserves or from the high fat meal that you just ate. And the production of ketones doesn’t necessarily mean you are burning body fat. So when keto dieters add fat to their diet through bulletproof coffee or coconut oil, it is burnt as fuel instead of body fat – which defeats the object of the diet achieving weight loss.

Wilder's colleague, paediatrician Mynie Gustav Peterman, later formulated the classic diet, with a ratio of one gram of protein per kilogram of body weight in children, 10–15 g of carbohydrate per day, and the remainder of calories from fat. Peterman's work in the 1920s established the techniques for induction and maintenance of the diet. Peterman documented positive effects (improved alertness, behaviour and sleep) and adverse effects (nausea and vomiting due to excess ketosis). The diet proved to be very successful in children: Peterman reported in 1925 that 95% of 37 young patients had improved seizure control on the diet and 60% became seizure-free. By 1930, the diet had also been studied in 100 teenagers and adults. Clifford Joseph Barborka, Sr., also from the Mayo Clinic, reported that 56% of those older patients improved on the diet and 12% became seizure-free. Although the adult results are similar to modern studies of children, they did not compare as well to contemporary studies. Barborka concluded that adults were least likely to benefit from the diet, and the use of the ketogenic diet in adults was not studied again until 1999.[10][14]


In the first week, many people report headaches, mental fogginess, dizziness, and aggravation. Most of the time, this is the result of your electrolytes being flushed out, as ketosis has a diuretic effect. Make sure you drink plenty of water and keep your sodium intake up.6One of the fathers of keto, Dr. Phinney, shows that electrolyte levels (especially sodium) can become unbalanced with low carb intake.
go try Coke zero or Pepsi zero or even Dr Pepper sugar free, it is so sweet I keep thinking they’ve given me the wrong soda! What you are probably missing is the caffeine. Most headache meds have a combination of acetaminophen, aspirin and caffeine (look at a box of BC powder or Excedrin, caffeine is listed as pain reliever aid)…the caffeine crash can be BRUTAL and it is a real thing….the sugar let down won’t be so bad if you THINK your drink tastes close to the same. I haven’t been on a low carb for many years but I heard about this diet yesterday and am seriously considering it b/c I have major diabetes issues and a friend told me his son has lost 100 lbs and went completely off meds so I decided to look it up.
If you’re looking to get a jump start on your health and fitness goals this year, you may be thinking about trying the ketogenic diet. Maybe you’ve heard the phrase before — it’s a huge diet buzzword — but aren’t sure what it means. Here’s a primer: The ketogenic diet is an eating plan that drives your body into ketosis, a state where the body uses fat as a primary fuel source (instead of carbohydrates), says Stacey Mattinson, RDN, who is based in Austin, Texas.
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